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POET for health services

POET for Personal Health Budget Holders and Family Carers

In Control, Lancaster University and Think Local Act Personal have published the findings of the  third personal outcomes evaluation tool (POET )of over 500 personal health budget holders and carers.

The purpose of the Personal Outcomes Evaluation Tool (POET) survey 2015 for Personal Health Budget Holders and Family Carers is to provide insight into the experiences of personal health budget holders and their families. The survey also shows the impact having control over the budget has on their lives.

Findings can be used by NHS and local authorities to assess the effectiveness of their delivery methods and to set priorities for improving the process.

Altogether 302 personal health budget holders from 31 different areas across the country and 247 carers from 37 different areas completed the survey.

In the sample of POET survey respondents, the most common way to use their budget was on care and support services (59.6%), followed by personal assistants (48.3%), community and leisure services (26.8%) and equipment (25.2%).

Over 80% of personal health budget holders reported their budget having a positive impact on their quality of life, independence and arranging support. Over 60% reported their budget having a positive impact on their relationships with people paid to support them, as well as a positive impact on their friendships, physical and mental health.

Over three quarters of carers said that having a personal health budget had improved day to day stress, quality of life of the carer, quality of life of the person, choice and control the carer has in life.

People most commonly managed their personal health budget through direct payments (36.7%), followed by direct payments looked after by a friend or family member (26.2%), service provider managed personal health budgets accounted for (13.1%), council or NHS-managed personal health budgets (11.1%) and personal health budgets managed by a broker (11.5%) were less common.

Last Updated : 15 June 2016. Page Author: Gaynor Cockayne.